The Games Of The XXVII Olympiad- Official Music From The Opening Ceremony

Label:

Sony Music – 5005345000, BMG Australia Limited – 5005345000

Format:

CD, Album, Limited Edition

Country:

Australia

Released:

18 Sep 2000

 

Tin Symphony Part 1—–

Ian Cooper (3) & John Frohlich

Baritone Vocals – Dallas Watts,

Composed By Mixed By, Engineer, Guitar, Bass Guitar, Percussion, Vocals – John Frohlich 

Composed By, Mixed By, Engineer, Violin, Viola, Double Bass, Keyboards, Percussion, Vocals – Ian Cooper

Guitar – David Blenkhorn

Soprano Vocals – Helena Sindelar

Tin Whistle – Glenn Henrich

Olympic-album-cover

 

 

 

This rollicking reel, co-written and co-produced by Ian Cooper and John Frohlich, includes an Irish jig,

drums, bush sounds, lawn mowers, wood choppers, whip crackers and a multilayered choral montage.  

Tin Symphony received on ARIA Award as a contributor to

The Official Opening Ceremony Music of The Games Of The XXVII Olympiad--the #1 Album in 2000.

Awards-record for TIN SYMPHONY John Frohlich

” one of the centrepieces of the night, the Tin Symphony, a seven-minute extravaganza described by the American television networks as a celebration of Australia’s larrikinism....drew rapturous applause in the packed stadium.”                               --- Tony Jones, THE AGE, August 2008

Tin Symphony Part 1—–from Wikipedia with thanks:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2000_Summer_Olympics_opening_ceremony 

This rollicking reel, co-written and co-produced by Ian Cooper and John Frohlich, includes an Irish jig montaged with drums, bush sounds and voice. A multitude of performers dress as the iconic Australian bushranger Ned Kelly (with costumes based Sir Sidney Nolan's series of Ned Kelly paintings) then appear onto the stadium floor, with other symbolic items of the outback such as corrugated ironand storm water tanks present. A mechanical horse like vehicle was present which then changed into a wind mill. Cultural items such as woodcutting and whip cracking were showcased. Irish dancers present in this section danced on the corrugated iron sheets, with umbrellas made up to look like giant cogs and wheels to represent the industrial growth of Australia. The tempo changes as Australia's rural aspects were introduced. In the middle of the stadium floor, a shed was constructed from the corrugated iron sheets. Out of the shed comes a unique representation of sheep, an important livestock. The sheep were represented by performers in cardboard boxes, that move along with the music. Australian suburbia is then represented as the performers emerged from the cardboard boxes with simulations of Victa lawn mowers to form the Olympics Rings. The giant mechanical horse then made another appearance, before Nikki Webster, gives an apple to it. The mechanical horse neighs to signify the end of the segment.

 

Segment Director: Nigel Jamieson

Designer: Dan Potra

Choreographers: Karen Johnson Mortimer, Doug Jack, Legs on the Wall

Charting Choreographer: Jason Olthoff

Tin Symphony Part 1 Co-written and co-produced by Ian Cooper & John Frohlich © Baritone Vocals – Dallas Watts, Composed By Mixed By, Engineer, Guitar, Bass Guitar, Percussion, Vocals – John Frohlich Composed By, Mixed By, Engineer, Violin, Viola, Double Bass, Keyboards, Percussion, Vocals – Ian Cooper Guitar – David Blenkhorn Soprano Vocals – Helena Sindelar Tin Whistle – Glenn Henrich

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2000_Summer_Olympics_opening_ceremony

was commissioned, with Ian Cooper, to compose The Tin Symphony,

for the Sydney 2000 Olympic Games Opening Ceremony.

In her paper entitled: THE STORY OF AUSTRALIA: NATIONAL IDENTITY AND THE SYDNEY 2000 OLYMPIC GAMES OPENING CEREMONY, Leanne White 

writes of the Tin Symphony sequence:

 

 

..."Cook and his crew arrived on a stylised Endeavour ship and the not so subtle message was that they had come to change the natural order of things in this Great Southern Land. Held captive in a cage at the rear of the strange contraption was a white rabbit. The rabbit appeared to emphasise that the British had no idea how they would live in the harsh Australian environment. It was obvious that it would not take long to destroy the ancient natural balance that indigenous Australians had long nurtured, respected and protected...

 

...The break in the Ceremony between old and new Australia was incredibly abrupt. It was represented by a loud fireworks explosion released by Cook and immediately followed by a multitude of Ned Kelly dancers who entered the stadium with guns blazing....

 

...The Tin Symphony sequence included the largest number of Australian icons and therefore enabled the local audience, particularly those brought up in the bush, to remember treasured rustic relics such as corrugated iron, windmills, shearing sheds and rainwater tanks."

AAAFP075_HD

http://www.olympic.org/sydney-2000-summer-olympics

..."One can only hope that the powerful images of Australia's community beamed to billions--particularly the Opening and Closing of the Sydney 2000 Olympic Games--may have played a part in forming a compelling foundation from which a more reconciled Australia might eventually  emerge..." --Leanne White

 

Read more by Leanne White, Chapter 6,  Indigenous Australia and the Sydney 2000 Olympic Games: Mediated Messages of Respect and Reconciliation.  (2009) In J. Ali-Knight, M. Robertson, A. Fyall and A. Ladkin (eds.) International Perspectives on Festivals and Events: Paradigms of Analysis, pp 97-106. Oxford: Elsevier.

http://goo.gl/NJSMr4